Through the years the Newsmaker of the Year award, the registered intellectual property of the club – has become synonymous with the National Press Club.

Nominations are judged scientifically in terms of news value and the resulting media coverage created by the nominees.

Previous honours went to Nelson Mandela, Thabo Mbeki, FW de Klerk, the South African Air Force, the late Hansie Cronje, Josia Thugwane, Penny Heyns, Big Brother, Zachie Achmat and the treatment Action Campaign and the Oscar winner Charlize Theron.

2017 Winner

The Gupta Leaks were named the 2017 National Press Club Newsmaker of the Year and the recipient of the award is the amaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism. The announcement was made on 28 January 2018. Read the release

Past winners

State capture, President Jacob Zuma, the Guptas and Adv Thuli Madonsela

National Press Club awards #FeesMustFall as Newsmaker of the Year for 2015

9 September 2016

#FeesMustFall was awarded as the 2015 National Press Club – Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University Newsmaker of the Year, at a ceremony in Pretoria tonight.

This annual award, made by the press club since 1980, awards a newsmaker in a calendar year based on the amount of media coverage received as well as the impact thereof. Nominations and motivations are received from press club members and a final decision made by the executive committee of the club.

“The decision to name #FeesMustFall as the newsmaker for 2015 was unanimous,” says club chairman Tanya de Vente-Bijker. “This was a major game-changer in our country. There is no doubt that tertiary education in South Africa will never be the same again.

“The last time the students of our country were united in a common cause like that was in 1976 when they protested against Afrikaans as a medium of instruction. However, this time around, #FeesMustFall received support across many sectors of our society, including students from across the globe,” she says.

“What the #FeesMustFall movement has brought to the fore is the plight of many poor South Africans whose ambitions of studying at our universities remain unrealistic due to the rising cost of higher education. Also notable with this movement, is how the power of technology can, in no time, bring people together in a common purpose.”

She says the role of the social media, complemented by widespread reports in traditional news media, was instrumental in the success of the campaign. “The #FeesMustFall campaign spread across all university campuses like wildfire and dominated the news environment for at least three weeks.

“With the message spreading on social media, protests across the country grew rapidly and the country witnessed a parliament invasion by students who stormed the South African parliament precinct. In central London hundreds of people gathered in front of the South African High Commission in solidarity with the campaign before marching through the city.

“For the first time in South Africa, the University of Cape Town brought an interdict against a hashtag. This demonstrates the huge influence that social media continues to have in South Africa.

“The fact that it led to President Jacob Zuma announcing that there would be no increase in tertiary education fees for 2016 illustrates the success and impact of the campaign.”

“Despite the fact that the significant damage to university property can never be condoned, regardless the circumstances, the #FeesMustFall campaign should be recognised for its significant contribution to shaping the higher education agenda and priorities,” says Prof Chris de Beer, Interim Vice-Chancellor of the Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University.

“By associating with this event the university wishes to confirm its public commitment to join and support all efforts to finding a comprehensive solution to these challenges.

“The actions taken by government, university leadership and business, to jointly find solutions for these imperatives, are well documented and the final outcomes are awaited with great expectation. As the future of higher education, and in effect our country, is at stake, I remain confident that a lasting solution will be found to the diverse challenges,” he says.

The National Press Club is synonymous with the Newsmaker of the Year award. Over the years the club has recognised and awarded many newsmakers. Previous recipients include President Jacob Zuma, former presidents Nelson Mandela, FW de Klerk and Thabo Mbeki, Hollywood star Charlize Theron and Thuli Madonsela. Last year the award went to the Oscar Pistorius trial.

 

For more information
Tanya de Vente-Bijker, Cell

+27 72 267 0751

Oscar Pistorius trial commemorated as Newsmaker of the Year for 2014

15 May 2015

The Oscar Pistorius trial has been commemorated as the National Press Club – North West University Newsmaker of the Year for 2014.

This includes the roles played in the trial by Oscar Pistorius himself, Judge Thokozile Masipa, prosecutor Adv Gerrie Nel and defence lawyer Adv Barry Roux.

National Press Club Chairperson Jos Charle says both in terms of impact and news value and media attention in electronic, print, online and social media, the trial dominated the news in 2014.

“For the first time in the history of South Africa, most of any trial’s court proceedings were broadcast live on a dedicated TV channel. An international Oscar Pistorius trial TV channel followed soon afterwards. At least four books have been published on the trial – with more in the offing.

“Media-wise the trial was bigger than the FIFA 2014 World Cup. Judge Thokozile Masipa’s banning of blogging and tweeting of graphic evidence by pathologist Gert Saayman prompted 2 500 articles. In 24 hours news and social media hit over 106 000 unique inserts. Pistorius having retched in court was carried in 2 300 news articles. In nine days the press hit the 750 000 article mark,” says Charle.

“Nothing could move the media attention away from Oscar,” says the media monitoring group Data Driven Insight.

“Media data was compiled from 6,2 million social media platforms including blogs, forums, social networks and commentary, 60 000 global online newspapers, 2 000 South African print publications and 66 radio and television stations.”

“A digital revolution has been in the offing for long, but this trial has finally drawn the line on the old mass media dispensation,” says Prof Johannes Froneman of the Journalism Department at the North-West University.

“The shroud of secrecy has been ripped off court proceedings. We could all see, hear and read – on TV, radio, newspaper and smartphones – how the trail was unfolding.

“How the media covers major stories now has a new pattern. The rumours of media convergence have ballooned. Media coverage during the trial was a combination of broadcast channels, printed newspaper, tweets, Facebook and blogs.

“Morning newspapers, for example, had to finally change its role as “reporter-in-the-morning” to a hybrid, day-and-night collector of news, views, highlights on social media and predictor of what will happen.

“Journalists now report on multiple platforms – simultaneously tweeting, taking photos, appearing in front of TV cameras and writing books. It also demands closer selection by the media user,” says Froneman.

Charle says the trial has irrevocably changed the manner in which news is compiled, covered and consumed.

“It is no longer a ‘one medium does one thing’ and ‘take it or leave it’. The trial has realised digital media presentation – both media producers and media consumers have become much more sophisticated – overnight.

“The extremely high media visibility of the trial also placed the tragic results of violent human behaviour in the forefront. The essential timeous attention to such behaviour cannot be over-emphasised. The National Press Club expresses its heart-felt sympathy to all the role-players that suffered from the actions that gave rise to this trial – especially the Steenkamp family,” says Charle.

The club is synonymous with the Newsmaker of the Year award. Over the years the club has recognised and awarded many newsmakers. Previous recipients include President Jacob Zuma, former presidents FW de Klerk, and Thabo Mbeki. Other newsmakers include Hollywood star Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the late Hansie Cronjé and various other sporting personalities, DA Leader Helen Zille, ESKOM and Cope and FIFA’s Sepp Blatter and Danny Jordaan also received the award in recent years. Other recipients were Thuli Madonsela and Julius Malema and the South African rhino. Last year the award went to the late Nelson Mandela – his legacy. He was also awarded before.

Journalist of the Year announced

The winners in the National Press Club – North-West University Journalist of the Year competition were also announced at the function.

Prof Dan Kgwadi, Vice-Chancellor of the North-West University, said: “The National Press Club and the North-West University have today recognised your excellent service to South Africa. We need to do our best at all times because the community, the entire country and the world depend on us. I believe this cooperation is mutually beneficial and will most certainly assist to ensure that our hard-fought right to information will never be forfeited.

“The freedom of the media is one of the cornerstones of our democracy, and for that reason it is of the utmost importance that we continue to acknowledge media freedom and that we continue to encourage independence and high standards of ethics in journalism, the quest for truth in the public interest and holding the powerful accountable.”

The winners of the different categories in the competition are:

Print media

  • Category 1 – News: Botho Molesankwe, The Star
  • Category 2 – Features: Kevin Ritchie, The Star
  • Category 3 – Photographs: Bongiwe Mchunu, The New Age

Electronic media

  • Category 4 – Radio news: Thando Kubheka, Eyewitness news
  • Category 5 – Radio features: Alex Eliseev, Eyewitness News
  • Category 6 – TV News: No entries
  • Category 7 – TV features: Graham Coetzer/Sasha Schwendenwein/Susan Comrie, Carte Blanche
  • Category 8 – TV camerawork: Thuthuka Zondi, eNCA
  • Category 9 – Online media: Vumani Mkize, Eyewitness News
  • Category 10 – Social media: Barry Bateman, Eyewitness News
  • Category 11 – Media Liaison Officer: Craig Allenby, National Zoological Gardens of SA
  • Category 12 – Editor of the Year: George Mazarakis, Carte Blanche
  • Journalist of the Year: Graham Coetzer/Sasha Schwendenwein/Susan Comrie, Carte Blanche

Nelson Mandela honoured as National Press Club – North-West University Newsmaker of the Year for 2013

29 May 2014

Nelson Mandela has been honoured as the National Press Club – North-West University Newsmaker of the Year for 2013.

National Press Club Chairperson Jos Charle said at the awards event in Pretoria this evening that both in terms of impact and media coverage Nelson Mandela dominated the news in 2013.

“We are not commemorating his death but celebrating the life of a world icon and legend, as well as his role as an international statesman.

“Nelson Mandela’s death riveted the attention of the world for 10 days. It consumed South Africans – and much of the world – as the country pulled out all stops to bury the father of the South African nation with military precision and ancient Xhosa customs.

“The world’s news media – television, radio and print media – extensively reported on Nelson Mandela’s life and his role in South Africa’s liberation struggle for weeks following his death.

“One hour after the announcement of his death, two million tweets were generated with over six million tweets recorded on 5 December, the day of his death. The hash tags #RIPNelsonMandela, #Madiba and #RIPMandela were the top three topics on the social network on that morning – at one stage 95 000 tweets per minute – more than 13 million over a month.

“The Nelson Mandela Facebook page gathered over 2,2 million likes and several posts, including tributes from the Nelson Mandela Foundation.

“Within minutes of the announcement, broadcast internationally, crowds of all hues began flocking to the former president’s home where they prayed, sang and laid flowers in front of the world’s media.

“Countries from the US to New Zealand joined South Africa in lowering their flags to half-mast and 91 heads of state attended the funeral, with 4 500 journalists from all over the world covering the funeral. South African broadcast houses ran only “Madiba” programmes for more than ten days.

“Add to this the fact that for 86 days last year the world’s media camped outside the Medi-Clinic Heart hospital in Pretoria where Mandela had been admitted for a recurring lung infection, and it becomes clear that he generated huge media interest – both nationally and internationally.”

Charle says in February – the month day he was released from Victor Verster Prison – Mandela became the first non-Briton to be honoured with a memorial service at Westminster Abbey – the iconic venue that has been the coronation church for every British monarch since 1066 and the burial place of 17 royals.

“The best known black man in the world and probably the most photographed man in the world certainly leaves behind a living legacy – truly a man for all seasons.”

Charle says the award is made on the grounds of impact, news value and media attention in electronic, print, online and social media.

Prof Herman van Schalkwyk, Vice-Principal of the North-West University said it is of utmost importance that we continue to acknowledge media freedom and encourage independence and high standards of ethical journalism. “This is the quest for truth in the public interest and appropriate accountability. We salute this endeavour by the National Press Club to raise the bar when it comes to the standards of journalism.”

The club is synonymous with the Newsmaker of the Year award. Over the years the club has recognised and awarded many newsmakers. Previous recipients include President Jacob Zuma, former presidents FW de Klerk, Nelson Mandela and Thabo Mbeki. Other newsmakers include Hollywood star Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the late Hansie Cronj� and various other sporting personalities, DA Leader Helen Zille, ESKOM and Cope and FIFA’s Sepp Blatter and Danny Jordaan also received the award in recent years. Other recipients were Thuli Madonsela and Julius Malema. Last year the award went to the South African rhino.

Journalist of the Year announced

The winners in the National Press Club-North-West University Journalist of the Year competition were also announced at the function. For the first time in the history of the competition, the overall winner was a television cameraperson, the late Dudley Saunders of Carte Blanche.

The winners in the print categories were Botho Molosankwe of The Star (news), Mia Malan of the Mail & Guardian (features) and Paballo Thekiso of The Saturday Star (photography).

The winners in the electronic media categories were Alex Eliseev of Eyewitness News (radio news), Melini Moses of the SABC (radio features), Dani�lla van Heerden of eNCA (television news), Kate Barry of Carte Blanche (television features) and Dudley Saunders of Carte Blanche (television cameraperson).

The winner in the online media category was Christa Eybers of Eyewitness News.

The media liaison officer of the year was Nandi Mokoena of the Competition Tribunal and the editor of the year was Ryk van Niekerk of Moneyweb.

Nelson Mandela National Press Club Newsmaker for 2013

29 January 2014

Nelson Mandela has been named the National Press Club’s Newsmaker of the Year for 2013.

National Press Club Chairperson, Jos Charle says both in terms of impact and media coverage Nelson Mandela dominated the news in 2013.

“We are not commemorating his death but celebrating the life of a world icon and legend, as well as his role as an international statesman.

“Nelson Mandela’s death riveted the attention of the world for 10 days. It consumed South Africans – and much of the world – as the country pulled out all stops to bury the father of the South African nation with military precision and ancient Xhosa customs.

“The world’s news media – television, radio and print media – extensively reported on Nelson Mandela’s life and his role in South Africa’s liberation struggle for weeks following his death.

“One hour after the announcement of his death, two million tweets were generated with over six million tweets recorded on 5 December, the day of his death. The hash tags #RIPNelsonMandela, #Madiba and #RIPMandela were the top three topics on the social network on that morning – at one stage 95 000 tweets per minute – more than 13 million over a month.

“The Nelson Mandela Facebook page gathered over 2,2 million likes and several posts, including tributes from the Nelson Mandela Foundation.

“Within minutes of the announcement, broadcast internationally, crowds of all hues began flocking to the former president’s home where they prayed, sang and laid flowers in front of the world’s media.

“Countries from the US to New Zealand joined South Africa in lowering their flags to half-mast and 91 heads of state attended the funeral, with 4 500 journalists from all over the world covering the funeral. South African broadcast houses ran only “Madiba” programmes for more than ten days.

“Add to this the fact that for 86 days last year the world’s media camped outside the Medi-Clinic Heart hospital in Pretoria where Mandela had been admitted for a recurring lung infection, and it becomes clear that he generated huge media interest – both nationally and internationally.”

Charle says on 11 February – the date on which he was released from Victor Verster Prison – Mandela will become the first non-Briton to be honoured with a memorial service at Westminster Abbey – the iconic venue that has been the coronation church for every British monarch since 1066 and the burial place of 17 royals.

“The best known black man in the world and probably the most photographed man in the world certainly leaves behind a living legacy – truly a man for all seasons.”

Stalwart journalist Jerry Scuitema sums it up brilliantly, “in my half century as a newsman I never experienced, or even witnessed such a puzzling media treatment as that of the passing of Nelson Mandela.

“It was mysteriously odd that the media could pay so much attention to the passing of one man. Channel after channel, column after column, blog after blog, post after post, tweet after tweet, could speak of nothing else. The stark reality was that much more than one man had died – what he represented was gone for all time.”

Charle says the award is made on the grounds of impact, news value and media attention in electronic, print, online and social media.

The club is synonymous with the Newsmaker of the Year award. Over the years the club has recognised and awarded many newsmakers. The club has named Nelson Mandela its newsmaker before. Other previous recipients include President Jacob Zuma, former presidents FW de Klerk, and Thabo Mbeki. Other newsmakers include Hollywood star Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the late Hansie Cronj� and various other sporting personalities, DA Leader Helen Zille, ESKOM and Cope and FIFA’s Sepp Blatter and Danny Jordaan also received the award in recent years. Other recipients were Thuli Madonsela and Julius Malema. Last year the award went to the South African rhino.

The date of the Newsmaker award function will be announced soon.

The winner of the National Press Club-North-West University Journalist of the Year competition will also be announced at the function.

Thuli Madonsela and Julius Malema awarded newsmakers of the National Press Club – Aon South Africa Newsmaker of the Year 2011

23 March 2012

“We don’t need a media tribunal – we are able and capable of regulating ourselves.”

This is according to Yusuf Abramjee, Chairman of the National Press Club.

Speaking at the National Press Club – Aon South Africa – Newsmaker of the Year award in Pretoria, Abramjee said a government appointed tribunal will be an insult to our democracy and our constitution.

Public Protector Thuli Madonsela and suspended ANC Youth League President Julius Malema were awarded as the joint National Press Club – Aon South Africa Newsmakers of the Year for 2011.

“While the Press Ombudsman system has shortcomings and urgently need to be strengthened, we continue to demand self-regulation. The media, however, should always pride itself on balanced, fair, accurate and independent journalism.

“The club declared Black Tuesday late last year. It was the day when the National Assembly voted in favour of what some call the ‘secrecy laws’. Not only did the media unite, but civil society also. Hundreds of NGOs, leading academics, politicians past and present, corporate South Africa and many throughout the world has spoken out against the bill.

“Freedom of speech and freedom of expression is key to a free media. Any move to silence us will be opposed at every turn. There is no way that we can go back to the dark days of apartheid when censorship, banning orders and the arrest of editors and journalists was the modus operandi of the government of that time.

“If government is are going to forge ahead with the bill, we will have Black Monday, Black Tuesday, Black Wednesday, Black Thursday, Black Friday, Black Saturday, Black Sunday – the fight continues,” said Abramjee.

“Both Madonsela and Malema made headlines day in and day out. They dominated the pages of our newspapers and the airwaves. They got us talking, writing and debating.

Aon South Africa Chief Executive Officer Anton Roux says the fact that two individuals on vastly different poles of the public reporting spectrum can be newsmakers is a clear indication of how diverse and free South Africa’s media can report.

“This is a privilege that can never again be forfeited. We at Aon South Africa are proud to be associated with such a scientifically determined award that recognises people who capture public sentiment and fuel open, democratic debate. It is an opportunity to recognise the courage and the commitment of the media and ordinary South Africans to ensure that our hard won media freedom remains intact. It also allows us to impress upon each and every journalist the enormous responsibility they have in ensuring that as citizens, we can continue to believe what we read and hear in the news,” said Roux.

Sepp Blatter and Danny Jordaan named National Press Club – Glenrand M-I-B Newsmakers for 2010

6 January 2011

Sepp Blatter, FIFA President and Danny Jordaan, CEO of the Local Organising Committee have been named the National Press Club – Glenrand M-I-B Newsmakers of the Year for 2010 for the successful hosting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

National Press Club Chairperson Yusuf Abramjee says the 2010 FIFA World Cup was in the media almost every day in 2010 and it was on the lips of most South Africans for many months.

“South Africa was the first African country to host a football world cup tournament. Ten stadiums were built, of which five were brand new iconic stadiums, more than three million spectators and 400 000 international visitors visited South Africa in two months.

“Government spent about R600 billion on infrastructure development, much of this for world cup related projects and invested R170 billion into the transport system in five years from 2005 to 2010.

“The South African Police Force spent R640 million on the deployment of 41 000 officers specifically for the event, resulting in the safest tournament ever. And the word vuvuzela was taken up in the dictionary,” says Abramjee.

According to Grant Thornton the 2010 FIFA World Cup contributed R55 billion to the South African economy between 2006 and 2010, generated 415 400 jobs and contributed R19,3 billion in income tax to government.

“The award is made on the grounds of impact, news value and media attention,” says Abramjee.

According to Monitoring SA the 2010 FIFA World Cup was mentioned no less than 20 700 times in the South African print media, more than 10 300 times in the broadcast media and over 16 700 times on online media, just around the time of the tournament.

“Over two million tweets were recorded during the tournament. The most tweets ever recorded during a single event were at the end of the final match.

“The nation rallied behind Bafana Bafana and we wore our football shirts with pride. The world cup created much excitement, unity and patriotism. South Africa was taken to the world. Who will ever forget the scenes on the streets of Sandton and other towns and cities when, two days before the opening world cup game, tens of thousands of people converged to support Bafana Bafana.

“The 2010 FIFA World Cup was the biggest support ever for any sport in the history of South Africa,” says Abramjee. “The tournament brought lots of excitement, fun and a great vibe and made us proud South Africans. Blatter and Jordaan and their teams did us proud.”

The National Press Club is synonymous with the Newsmaker of the Year award. Over the years the club has recognised and awarded many newsmakers. Previous recipients include President Zuma and former presidents FW de Klerk, Mandela and Mbeki. Other newsmakers include Hollywood star Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the late Hansie Cronj� and various other sporting personalities, Helen Zille, ESKOM and Cope. A date for the award function will be announced soon, where the winner of the National Press Club � North-West University Journalist of the Year competition will also be announced.

NEWS RELEASE President Jacob Zuma awarded the National Press Club – Glenrand MIB Newsmaker of the Year 2009 The National Press Club Pretoria has awarded President Jacob Zuma as the Newsmaker of the Year for 2009. He was announced as the winner of this annual award earlier this year. National Press Club Chairperson, Yusuf Abramjee, said at a formal banquet at the CSIR in Pretoria on 19 March that it took a lot of discussion, deliberation and even debate amongst members of the National Press Club to reach a decision. “There is no doubt that 2009 was President Jacob Zuma’s year. He dominated the centimetre column space in the print media and much of the airwaves in the electronic media,” said Abramjee. “Corruption charges against him were dropped in the early part of the year. He then walked the streets canvassing, and millions voted. He won, celebrated, were sworn in, addressed the nation, appointed a cabinet, got down to work, visited areas affected by poor service delivery, launched the Presidential hotline, appointed a new National Police Commissioner and other top government officials, received many foreign visitors, visited several foreign countries, engaged leaders from all spheres of society, NGO’s and ordinary South Africans. He made the headlines, as some will say, for good and bad reasons,” he said. Abramjee said President Jacob Zuma was labelled a Peoples’ President by some – just months after taking office. He complimented Zuma for engaging the media continuously. “This award is made on the grounds of impact, news value and media attention,” he said. Zuma is the fourth head of state to be named newsmaker. Previous recipients were F W de Klerk, Nelson Mandela and Thabo Mbeki. In 2005, Zuma was named by the press club as Newsmaker of the Year when he was Deputy President of the ANC. At the time, he was entangled in legal battles. According to Monitoring SA, Zuma was mentioned no less than 22 300 times in the South African print media, nearly 33 000 times in the broadcast media and over 12 500 times on online media during 2009. Abramjee called on the media fraternity to continue to report accurately, fairly, independently, without fear or favour, without bias, and boldly. “We have seen over the past few weeks – an escalation in name calling and attacks on individuals personally. This is very unfortunate. The name-calling must stop. While the media tackle and expose issues, challenge, and highlight what is right and what is wrong, let’s all act with dignity. It is wrong to refer to President Zuma in such demeaning ways, as did some British media reports recently. In the same vein, when spokespeople and some organisations call journalists “mobs, gangs, criminals, sick and mentally ill” we need to condemn it in the strongest possible terms. These individuals and organisations who resort to intimidating the media, need to be brought to order.” He also said that reckless and irresponsible allegations that reporters sleep with politicians to get stories, are corrupt or criminals must be proven, or those that make the allegations must rather keep quiet. -2- The press club also announced its National Press Club – North- West University Journalist of the Year awards on the night. Other nominees for the 2009 newsmaker title included ANC Youth League President, Julius Malema, athlete Caster Semenya and ex Springbok rugby captain Joost van der Westhuizen. Over the years the club has recognised and awarded many newsmakers. Previous recipients also included Hollywood star Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the late Hansie Cronjé and various other sporting personalities, the DA’s Helen Zille, ESKOM and Cope. High resolution photos are available. (Ends) Issued by: Martin van Niekerk Junxion Communications Tel 012 804 8812 / 083 447 4864 For: Yusuf Abramjee Chairman, National Press Club Tel 082 44 4203 Date: Friday, 19 March 2010

NEWS RELEASE CONGRESS OF THE PEOPLE (COPE) AND ESKOM NAMED NATIONAL PRESS CLUB’S NEWSMAKER OF THE YEAR The National Press Club has named the Congress of the People (COPE) and ESKOM as joint Newsmakers of the Year for 2008. “It was a very tough decision to choose between COPE and ESKOM and therefore the decision to award a joint newsmaker,” says National Press Club Chairman Patrick Hlahla. “This award is made annually on the grounds of impact, news value and media attention, both print and electronic, following nominations received from club members. “2008 was such a roller-coaster year that we did not always realise what an amazing news year it was. Nominations like Thabo Mbeki, Jacob Zuma, the Scorpions and Julius Malema certainly had the executive committee of the club thinking. We are, however, convinced that these two are equally worthy contenders – hence the decision to make a joint award,” says Hlahla. ESKOM made news headlines, especially during the first half of 2008, where COPE dominated news headlines in the second half of the year with the split from the ANC and the forming of a new political party. “The beginning of 2008 saw many South Africans come to terms with a term and system that had a major impact on everyone in the country’s lives – load shedding. People got stuck in traffic, small businesses suffered mayor financial losses and the sales of candles and generators escalated.” According to Monitoring South Africa (MSA) there were 48 320 unique news items on ESKOM and the power crisis. MSA says media coverage levels of ESKOM went down in October and November to half of the volume that was recorded in April and May. “The last few months of 2008 saw an incredible, dramatic and irrevocable change in the South African political landscape. What has been described by political commentators as a sure sign of the maturing of South Africa’s democracy, the political party COPE was established. “COPE’s national convention, the launch of its logo, the official launch of the party, the court cases, its stated intentions and the names of prominent people joining the party, have been reported on both electronic and print media for most of the latter part of last year,” says Hlahla. Details of an awards ceremony for COPE and ESKOM will be announced later. 2 The National Press Club has named Newsmakers of the Year for more than twenty years and previous recipients include President Thabo Mbeki and former Presidents Nelson Mandela and FW de Klerk, the late Hansie Cronjé, the South African Rand, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, Charlize Theron, Jacob Zuma, Helen Zille and a host of other prominent South Africans. (Ends) Issued by: Ben Rootman Junxion Communications Tel 012 804 8812 / 082 551 4853 For: Patrick Hlahla Chairman National Press Club Tel 084 274 2817 Date: Thursday, 29 January 2009

NEWS RELEASE JAKE WHITE AND THE SPRINGBOKS AWARDED NATIONAL PRESS CLUB’S NEWSMAKER OF THE YEAR The National Press Club has awarded Jake White and the Springboks as its Newsmaker of the Year for 2007. They were named as the winners of this annual award earlier this year, based on the grounds of impact, news value and the media attention they received in both print and electronic media during 2007. National Press Club Chairman Patrick Hlahla said at the award function at Unisa in Pretoria today that Jake White and the Springboks made the headlines very regularly in 2007. “This culminated in the Springboks becoming the best team on the International Rugby Board’s rankings when they beat England 15-6 in the World Cup final at the Stade de France on Saturday, 20 October 2007. “Furthermore the Springboks passed the 90-point mark in the board’s rankings for the very first time in the past more than four years. In doing so they became only the third team to reach the milestone. The All Blacks and England are the only other teams that have achieved this.” Monitoring South Africa conservatively calculates local media coverage in terms of advertising value equivalent of the Springbok win during that time at well over R42 million, with the total of print and electronic mentions that appeared at more than 3 000. “However, the value of the Springbok’s victory in terms of nation building in South Africa is immeasurable. By far the greatest portion of the entire South African population supported White and the Springboks as a truly national team. Seeing the Cabinet, members of parliament and thousands of citizens welcoming the Boks back – all dressed in Springbok jerseys – will remain in one’s mind for a very long time,” Hlahla said. The President of the ANC, Jacob Zuma, was the strongest contender among a number of other nominations, which included the late Sheldean Human, Jackie Selebe and the ANC conference in Polokwane. 2 The National Press Club has named Newsmakers of the Year for more than twenty years and previous recipients include former President Thabo Mbeki, Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the South African Rand, Jacob Zuma, Helen Zille and a host of other prominent South Africans. (Ends) Issued by: Martin van Niekerk Junxion Communications Tel 012 804 8812 / 083 447 4864 For: Patrick Hlahla Chairman, National Press Club Tel 083 482 6309 Date: Thursday, 4 December 2008

NEWS RELEASE HELEN ZILLE RECEIVES NATIONAL PRESS CLUB’S NEWSMAKER OF THE YEAR AWARD The National Press Club has awarded Helen Zille, Executive Mayor of Cape Town, as its Newsmaker of the Year for 2006. National Press Club Chairman Patrick Hlahla said at the award function at Unisa in Pretoria tonight that Zille made the headlines very regularly in 2006. “Following the municipal elections in March, she eventually became mayor after deals with smaller political parties. The balance of power in Cape Town remained controversial and newsworthy throughout the year. “Other issues that kept her in the national media include the dismissal of the previous municipal manager, the city’s readiness to participate in the 2010 Soccer World Cup tournament, specifically in relation to the Green Point stadium, and the N2 Gateway housing project. “The media also focused on the city’s handling of municipal debts when organisations owing large amounts – even a provincial government department – suddenly found themselves without power. Also, media speculation around the successor of DA leader Tony Leon, positioning Zille as a strong contender, kept her in the public eye until the end of 2006.” Zille succeeded Tony Leon as Democratic Alliance leader earlier this year. Hlahla said Zille certainly has a very high media profile which she uses to communicate the difficulties of running South Africa’s only non-ANC held city. “The award is made on the grounds of impact, news value and media attention, both print and electronic and follows nominations received from club members, based on newsworthiness and the extent of media coverage received.” The runner-up was Kabelo Thibedi, who held hostage a Department of Home Affairs official in a desperate attempt to obtain his identity document. Other nominations were ANC Deputy President Jacob Zuma – National Press Club Newsmaker in 2005 – Schabir Shaik, Police Commissioner Jackie Selebi, previous Democratic Alliance leader Tony Leon and escaped and rearrested convict Ananias Mathe. 2 The National Press Club has named Newsmakers of the Year for more than twenty years and previous recipients include President Thabo Mbeki and former Presidents Nelson Mandela and FW de Klerk, Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the late Hansie Cronjé, the South African Rand, the South African Air Force and a host of other prominent South Africans. (Ends) Issued by: Martin van Niekerk Junxion Communications Tel 012 804 8812 / 083 447 4864 For: Patrick Hlahla Chairman, National Press Club Tel 072 348 0374

NEWS RELEASE JACOB ZUMA NAMED NATIONAL PRESS CLUB’S NEWSMAKER OF THE YEAR The National Press Club has named former Deputy President Jacob Zuma its Newsmaker of the Year for 2005. National Press Club Chairman Ben Rootman says this decision follows nominations received from club members, based on the basic criteria of newsworthiness and the extent of media coverage received. “This award is made on the grounds of impact, news value and media attention, both print and electronic. The decision for 2005 was not a difficult one for the club’s executive committee, as by far the majority of nominations received were for Mr Zuma. The choice was obvious.” Rootman says Zuma dominated the news headlines for most of 2005. “While his life was certainly took a dramatic turn last year, the events that unfolded, like the judgment in the Schabir Shaik case and him subsequently being relieved of his duties as Deputy President of the country, made dramatic national and international news stories. “The commencement of legal proceedings against Mr Zuma, both for alleged corruption and rape, kept him in the news. The unfolding of these legal proceedings this year will no doubt be equally newsworthy.” The National Press Club has named Newsmakers of the Year for more than twenty years and previous recipients include President Thabo Mbeki and former Presidents Nelson Mandela and FW de Klerk, Charlize Theron, Zachie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the late Hansie Cronjé, the South African Rand and a host of other prominent South Africans. (Ends) Issued by: Junxion Communications Tel 012 342 0456 For: Ben Rootman Chairman, National Press Club Tel 082 551 4853

News release National Press Club makes the first African Best Actress Oscar Award winner its Newsmaker of the Year for 2004 Tuesday 18 January 2005 The National Press Club has awarded the first African to win a Best Actress Oscar Award – Charlize Theron – its Newsmaker of the Year for 2004. Theron received the Oscar for her lead role in Monster. National Press Club chairman Ben Rootman says the nominations were particularly strong during a good news year in 2004 with the Olympics swimming relay team and the 2010 Soccer World Cub bid being strong contenders. “However, the media impact of Theron’s award was tremendous. Apart from appearing on the front page of Time Magazine – a rare achievement for a film star – she was seen and quoted extensively on both electronic and print media internationally, and her media profile during her visit to South Africa, after receiving the award, was tremendous. “Apart from umpteen appearances on local television and radio shows and in the printed press, Beeld and Pretoria News, for example, published special editions to mark her Oscar Award. “ Rootman says besides the Oscar, she was the first South African to win a Golden Globe Award and in the words of President Mbeki “ is proof that South Africa as a nation can produce the best in the world.” “So strong did President Mbeki feel about her that he hosted a special function in her honour and included her in the team to persuade FIFA to award the 2010 World Cup tournament to South Africa. “However, Theron’s influence goes further than the Oscar Award. Her business acumen is remarkable. She planned, and co-financed, the production of Monster at least three years ago to ensure that the product is worthy of an Oscar. The Press Club plans to hand the award to her at a ceremony in South Africa. -2- “All of this from a 28-year old woman who was not born with the proverbial golden spoon in her mouth. She is an outstanding ambassador for South Africa and an icon for all new South Africans, proving that the will to survive – and prosper – is achievable. She is a worthy receiver of the National Press Club’s prestigious Newsmaker of the Year Award for 2004, “ says Rootman. The Newsmaker of the Year title is registered in the name of the National Press Club. Previous recipients include President Thabo Mbeki, former Presidents Nelson Mandela and F W de Klerk, Zackie Achmat and the Treatment Action Campaign, the South African Air Force, the National Rugby Team, former cricket captain, the late Hansie Cronjé, the South African Rand and a host of other prominent South Africans. (Ends) Issued by: Junxion Communications Tel: 012 342 0345 For: National Press Club Enquiries: Ben Rootman Chairman, National Press Club, Pretoria Cell 082 551 4853

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